UK-Environmentalists Rallied with Bangladeshis to Save the Sundarbans on Global Day of Protest

  • Thousands of environmentalists protested across the globe
  • Successful protests held in Bangladesh, UK and 16 more countries expressing grave concerns about devastating impact of Rampal power plant

 

global-day-of-protest-rally-against-rampal-power-plant-to-save-the-sudnerbans-held-at-altab-ali-park-in-london-07-01-17

Saturday, the 7th January 2017,  has been celebrated as a Global Day of Protest to Save the Sunderbans and to stop the Rampal coal-power plant. Alongside nationwide protests in Bangladesh, UK’s green activists together with environmentalists of Bangladeshi community in the UK staged a colourful and loud demonstration at Altab Ali Park in London. Over 40 community activists and many transnational environmentalists rallied with beautiful placards and banners displaying powerful images of tigers, rivers, trees, humans and signs of large waving hands as symbols of ‘NO’.  They shouted “‘No’ to Rampal Power Plant”.

global-day-of-protest-rally-at-altab-ali-park-on-7-january-2017

 

 

In the two hour-rally, organised by the Committee to Protect Oil-Gas-Mineral Resources, Power and Port in Bangladesh, speakers said that it is incredible that Bangladeshi government entered a deal with Indian corporations to build coal-fired plant in Rampal, which would leave devastating impact on 50 million people in Bangladesh and the world’s largest mangrove, called the Sundarbans. When UK, Germany, Denmark and Finland are rethinking about the negative aspects of coal-energy, Bangladeshi government has chosen dirty coal energy that would destroy the country’s ecology.  Protesters called on Bangladeshi government to scrap the contentious deal with India with immediate action.

 

Meanwhile, more than 4000 people took to the streets in Dhaka, Berlin, Halle, The Hague, Paris, Gwangju, Hordaland, Kolkata, Turku, New York, Melbourne and many other states of the world to protest against the Rampal plant that will be built by the Indian company, called the National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) and Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL), within 9 kilometers to an ecologically sensitive area, called the Sundarbans mangrove in Bangladesh.

global-day-of-protest-poster-for-london-rally-by-akhter-s-khan-7-january-2017

The Sundarbans is the largest single tract mangrove forest. It is extraordinarily rich in biodiversity, and is a World Heritage site.  But it is now in grave danger of losing its unique biodiversity and rare eco-system because of a planned coal fired power plant in Rampal. The threats to the Sundarbans are so critical that the UNESCO has also warned that the Sundarbans “may fall in grave danger if the planned coal-fired power-plant is established”.

 

The 1320 MW Rampal coal-fired power plant is a joint project of Power Development Board of Bangladesh and NTPC and BHEL of India. It is a great threat to the survival of Sundarbans because it would not only pollute environment by the coal-power plant but also is inviting a range of national and international vested interest groups to seize forest and to set up hundreds of commercial projects in and around the mangrove which would destroy the forest.

“The project has not only put the livelihood of at least 3.5 million people at risk, it has made the lives of around 50 million coastal people vulnerable to natural disasters as the Sundarbans have also been a huge natural safe guard against frequent cyclone, storm and other natural disasters in the country”, said Professor Anu Muhammad –  the member secretary of the National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral Resources, Power and Port in Bangladesh (NCBD).

global-day-of-protest-rally-in-london-7-january-2017

The NCBD has declared a five-year peoples movement for the cancellation of Rampal power plant earlier. Saturday’s global action was part of this long-term movement that has been shared with hundreds of green activists across the world. The call for global day of protest was first heard at a grand rally on November 26, 2016 at the Central Shaheed Minar in Dhaka which was attended by over 15 thousands of people from across Bangladesh. In response to the call for a global day of protest, demonstrations, rallies and public meetings were held in Bangladesh, India, Australia,  Canada, Germany, Finland, France, Italy, Indonesia, Nepal,  Netherlands, Norway, South Korea, UK and USA. Thousands of protesters across the world vowed that they will stand with the movement to save the Sundarbans from mass destruction, and will work together to build a stronger global movement which would uphold public interest before profit.

As a next step to this global day of action, the NCBD has called for a half-day strike to be held on 26 January, 2017. The UK branch of the NCBD and Phulbari Solidarity Group will also hold public meeting in the UK in solidarity with the strikers in Bangladesh.

global-day-of-protest-in-london-on-7-january-2017

Read More:

Protests held globally against Rampal plant: Dhaka Tribune on 08 January 2017 [http://www.dhakatribune.com/bangladesh/environment/2017/01/08/protests-held-globally-rampal-plant/]

Successful Global Day of Protest To Protect Sundarbans: Asia Pacific Women, Law and Development on 07 January 2017 [http://apwld.org/press-release-successful-global-day-of-protest-to-protect-sundarbans/]

UN tells Bangladesh to halt mangrove-threatening coal-plant: The Guardian on 19 October 2016 [https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/oct/19/un-tells-bangladesh-to-halt-mangrove-threatening-coal-plant]

Further updates and more photos are available on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/218877755230424/

 

 

 

Scrap the Rampal Power Plant project, Save the Sundarbans

As the government of Bangladesh suggests that the destructive deal with India cannot be scrapped due to delicate conditions of the contract, the National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral Resources, Power and Port in Bangladesh has written the following open letter to Indian Prime Minister. We believe that the Prime Minister of India can and should act promptly to halt Rampal Coal Power Plant.

 

anup-kundus-photo-28-jan-2015-copy Stop-rampal-coal-power-plant-poster-by-Rudro Rothi-on-1-august-2016

 

October 18, 2016

Scrap the Rampal power plant project, Save the Sundarbans

Open Letter to the Prime Minister of India

 

The Honourable Prime Minister,

We respectfully address you with grave concern and anxiety. The people of Bangladesh today is sternly worried over the future of the Sundarbans, which not only happens to be the only protection barrage of the southern belt of Bangladesh, but also the largest Mangrove Forest of the world, as well as the most valuable ecological habitat of the country and the World Heritage Site. The joint venture of both India and Bangladesh to build a 1320 MW capacity coal-fired power plant has caused much worry among the people of Bangladesh.

We have already written to the Honourable Prime Minister of Bangladesh regarding this. As India is the major partner of this project, we believe, as the head of the Indian government, it is fundamentally important for us to address also to you in this regard, mainly for two reasons. The Rampal Power Plant, officially known as the Maitree Super Thermal Power Project, is a joint venture project of BPDB of Bangladesh and NTPC Limited of India. As per the joint venture agreement signed between Bangladesh and India, NTPC is responsible for planning, building and operating the plant. Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL) is now officially responsible for engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) of the Rampal Power Plant. Exim Bank, a state bank of India, has been officially selected for financing this project, whereas Coal India Limited, most probably, is going to be appointed for supplying of necessary coal.

Secondly, if the Sundarbans, adjacent to the Bangladesh part is damaged, it would have a massive spillover effect on the Indian portion as well, affecting the lives and livelihood of the people of India living near Sundarban.

Based on studied opinion of a significantly large number of local and international experts, it is obvious that this particular coal-fired power plant would bring extensive destruction to the forest. It is also worth noting that, following the decision of building a power plant in Rampal, a range of influential business groups and commercial projects have pierced into the same area. It is predicted that the cumulative effect of such commercial aggression would ultimately cause fatal destruction to the Sundarbans.

It is important to note that around 3 to 4 million people including forest and fishing folks are dependent on the Sundarbans and the adjacent water bodies for their natural livelihood. Around 40 million people live in the southern coastal belt of Bangladesh. The power plant is ringing an alarm to the entire coastal community. Moreover, the damage would not be merely restricted to the Bangladesh portion of the Sundarbans. Around 5 million people living near to the Indian portion of the Sudnarbans would be put into grave danger too. Eventually, future generations from both nations would have to bear the deadly impact of the plant.

Obviously, we do not deny ‘development’. Power grids are also vital to modern lives. However, what is not acceptable is the implementation of some environmentally deadly projects which would merely profit the vested interest groups at the cost of the people and environment.

You must be aware of the fact that  this project has drawn huge criticism from both India and Bangladesh, and around the world. The UNESCO, the Ramsar Authority, the South Asian Human Rights Forum led by IK Gujral of India, along with other 150 various organizations have also opposed to the plant and demanded to scrap the deal. The Norwegian Council of Ethics has already withdrawn their fund from this controversial project.

Even the Minister of Finance of Bangladesh has admitted that inevitable environmental damage will be there, nevertheless the project must go on (15 February, 2016)1. We do not want to believe that it is the Government of India who is insisting on the project. Rather, we believe that the Government of India can play a vital role in saving the world’s largest Mangrove Forest by scrapping this controversial project.

Honourable Prime Minister,

The plant site is located on North of the Sundarbans, only 14 kilometers away from its boundary and within merely 4 kilometers of the Ecologically Critical Area (ECA).This site is only 2 meters above the sea level. It obviously holds a key financial and operating risk given the fact that it falls within a tidal delta region which experienced a tidal surge with the height of 5 meters. EIA study itself further notes that the Rampal plant would be in the “wind risk zone” of Bangladesh. It is worthy noting that this particular zone witnessed 16 cyclones in the past 25 years. We are deeply worried that the site’s location and elevation will be at extreme risk should sea levels rise or should an extreme weather event occur. In such events, the ash ponds – located near the Possur River – could easily be washed away putting the river at a serious ecological risk. The river is, in fact, one of the vital water bodies that provides fresh water flow to the world’s largest mangrove forest.

The Indian EIA guideline 2010 itself disallows setting up of similar projects within 25 kilometers of ecologically sensitive areas of India, including forests, rivers, and sanctuaries.2 You must have been aware of the fact that due to such environmental consciousness of the Indian Government, a number of coal-fired plant and coal mining project has been called off by the Green Tribunal and the Ministry of Environment of India3. We would like to call for your attention that while moving forward with this project, the Indian company has violated all environmental rules and regulations of the Indian government itself.

For the production of electricity, the plant will annually consume 4.72 million tons of coal.4  The coal and other toxic and chemical materials required for the construction and operation of the power plant will be transported to the project site through the waterways of the Sundarbans. The transportation of coal (nearly 13 thousand tons per day) through the waterways of the Sundarbans holds dire prospect of coal spillage, ballast water, bilge water, oil spillage, lubricant, and garbage. For the next 30 years, the transportation of cargo and lighter vessels, and the loading and unloading of coal will indeed bring extensive damage to the ecology of the forest and the wildlife habitats.

To run the Power Plant, water of the Possur River will be withdrawn (at the rate of 9,150 m3/hour) and discharged (at the rate of 5,150 m3/hour) into it again after use with a varying temperature5. This will reduce the oxygen of the water and damage the fish stocks of the Possur River. The rising temperature, company admits at least 2C6, will also affect the entire ecosystem and biodiversity of the forest, including the Zooplankton, the Phytoplankton, and the marine ecology. If it continues for the next 25 to 30 years, the marine ecology and the biodiversity of the Possur River would be destroyed, as well as the hydrological characteristics of the river including its salinity front, salinity level, sedimentation pattern, and tidal behavior. Discharged water will also contain huge amount of Mercury if coal-washing is done as confirmed by the Authority.

 

The zoologists have shown concern that the toxic substances emitted from the coal-fired power plant including arsenic, lead, mercury, nickel, vanadium, beryllium, barium, cadmium, chromium, selenium, and radium are capable of contaminating the air and water to such an extent that it could harm the reproductive health system of the wild life animals and the species of the Sundarbans. The bird scientists are concerned that the coal-fired pollution may hamper the existence of at least 3 rare species of bird, which shelter in the Sundarbans.

The experts and engineers have long suggested that Ultra Super Critical Technology itself is only capable of reducing pollution only at a rate of 8 to 10 percent. Even if other pollutant reducing technology should be used, no record suggests that risk of pollution could be entirely eliminated.  For instance, the installation of FGD may reduce the risk of SO2 pollution, while increasing the chances of water pollution through the release of heavy chemical materials including Arsenic, Mercury, Selenium and Boron7. If low NOX Burner should be used, pollution could be reduced up to 40 to 60 percent, nevertheless, the rest of the toxin chemicals would remain hazardous enough to spoil the environment8. Though the authority has assured the use of FGD and ESP, the combined application of all such technology is capable of dropping the contamination level merely up to 48 percent9. On the other hand, the risk of release of an extensive amount of Mercury still persists, as there is no mention of applying any technology in tender document that regulates or controls the release of Mercury into the forestry and water10.

In the last few years, a number of accidents in the water routes, including deadly oil spill had left its long term footprints on the sensitive forest lives. The current transportation system on the Sundarbans area itself is creating severe sound and water pollution around the forest ecology. Lately, some sensitive locations around the forest have been announced as ‘endangered’ for the Irrawaddy Dolphins by the Government of Bangladesh. The Prime Minister of Bangladesh previously suggested bringing a complete halt to the transportation routes in the Shela River. However, the attempt failed. In these circumstances, we simply cannot take further risk by allowing a 1320 MW capacity of coal-fired plant on the backyard of the Sundarbans. Our experience with institutional capability is also frustrating11.

A coastal belt, in general, survives on the resistant capacity of the mangrove swamps. For instance, extensive commercial establishments in the coastal bodies of the New Orleans state of the USA have ultimately damaged the natural flow of Mississippi river. Due to the vulnerability of these coastal belt areas, Hurricane Katrina could make unprecedented damage to the coastal areas of New Orleans. In Bangladesh, during Hurricane Sidr and Aila, the Sundarbans has largely protected the people and resources of the southern coast. If the Sundarbans is damaged, the people and the species of the entire coastal belt will be practically unprotected.

We would like to stress on the point that no deadly experiement should be taken when the Sundarbans is concerned. Rather we demand to cancel the project, along with every other pollution enhancing projects and commercial activities around the Sundarbans. We also demand to bring a halt to the transportation of hazardous commodities around the Sudarbans. As Rampal power plant is not only a risk by itself, but also has consistently attracted a range of commercial ventures into the area; by scrapping the deal, the Indian government could play a crucial role in protecting the Sundarbans from all kind of forest damaging ventures.

The Sundarbans to us is not a subject of negotiation. Meanwhile, alternative locations and technology is available for power generation. Lately, the Srilankan government had cancelled a similar power plant deal with India (May 18, 2016)12. If Srilanka and India could scrap it, why not Bangladesh to prevent much bigger disaster?

Honourable Prime Minister,

We gratefully remember the contribution of India during the time of our liberation war in 1971. The people of Bangladesh have not forgotten the safe shelter that was provided by the people of India in a time of despair and misery. Nevertheless, it is also observed that the people of Bangladesh also hold much resentment towards the state of India due to its consistent measures of oppressive and humiliating policies. The Farakka dam, the upcoming dams along with the Indian river linking projects, border killing, the building of border fence, unfair trade agreements and loan terms, and the one sided transit deal are few Indian policies which have generated discontent in the minds of people of Bangladesh. And now it is the destructive power plant project.

We would like to stress on the point that people still expect solution of all earlier disputes, but if Sundarban is affected, the damage would be irrecoverable and there would be no turning back. The resentment and anger would stay for ever, the ‘friendship’ company will turn into permanent ‘source’ of hostility. We certainly do not want to create a condition as such. Rather we expect, for the sake of the friendship, the project should be called off. We believe, peaceful co-existence of the two nations could only be achieved through mutually respectable agreements and arrangements that would reflect the aspiration of both people in a fair and just manner.

Based on such aspirations, we hope that, you, as the Head of Indian government, along with our Prime Minister, would consider the genuine concerns of the people of Bangladesh and immediately scrap the Rampal Power Plant project.

 

Sincerely,

On behalf of the National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral Resource, Power and Port in Bangladesh

 

Engineer  Sheikh Muhammad Shahidullah, Convener,           Prof. Anu Muhammad, Member Secretary

 

#SavetheSundarbans #StopRampalCoalPowerPlant #NOtoRampalCoalPlant

 

References:

1) ¶wZ n‡jI mi‡e bv ivgcvj we`¨yr ‡K›`«: A_©gš¿x

Ittefak, 15 February, 2016

http://www.ittefaq.com.bd/national/2016/02/15/55597.html

Rampal power plant to be commissioned despite risk to ecology

http://bdnews24.com/bangladesh/2016/02/15/rampal-power-plant-to-be-commissioned-despite-risk-to-ecology

2) “Locations of thermal power stations are avoided within 25 km of the outer periphery of the following:

– metropolitan cities;

– National park and wildlife sanctuaries;

– Ecologically sensitive areas like tropical forest, biosphere reserve, important lake and coastal areas rich in coral formation;”

http://envfor.nic.in/sites/default/files/TGM_Thermal%20Power%20Plants_010910_NK.pdf

3) The need to preserve the Khajuraho temple, famous for its erotic sculptures, as well as nearby tiger and crocodile sanctuaries has prompted a government panel to hold off on clearing a Rs.18,000 crore thermal power plant in Madhya Pradesh.
http://www.livemint.com/Politics/k9O019qiWVwh1r6iyESE0K/Panel-defers-green-clearance-for-NTPCs-Rs18000-crore-plant.html

The National Green Tribunal (NGT) .. .. quashed the environmental clearance for the 3,600-MW thermal power plant proposed by IL&FS Tamil Nadu Power Company Limited in Cuddalore, on the grounds that no proper cumulative impact assessment was done.
http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/ngt-quashes-eco-nod-for-cuddalore-power-plant/article6587910.ece

Noting that a thermal power plant near human habitat and on agricultural land was not viable, a Central green panel has refused to give approval to the National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) to set up a 1320 MW coal-based project in Madhya Pradesh.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/ntpcs-coalbased-project-in-mp-turned-down/article819873.ece

4) Rampal EIA, page 378

http://bifpcl.com/new/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/EIA-Report-Volume-I.pdf

5) Rampal EIA, page 117.

6)“Temperature of discharge water shall never be more than two degree Centigrade (2OC) above river water temperature”- Question To Answer From Rampal Authority

http://energybangla.com/question-to-answer-from-rampal-authority/

7) Cleansing the Air at the Expense of Waterways

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/13/us/13water.html?_r=0

8) AN OVERVIEW OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR REDUCTION OF OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM COMBUSTION FURNACES, page-4

http://www.mpr.com/uploads/news/nox-reduction-coal-fired.pdf

9) https://netl.doe.gov/File%20Library/Research/Coal/ewr/mercury_-FGD-white-paper-Final.pdf

10) State-of-the-art technology for mercury control is sorbent injection in the boiler or in the flue gases followed by capture of the resultant particulates in a bag house. These technologies are simply missing in the tender document.

http://www.thedailystar.net/frontpage/10-questions-authorities-answers-counter-response-1281937

11) “90,000 m3 polluted water flowing into rivers around Dhaka every day”. Banik Barta, 2 April, 2016

https://goo.gl/GEzbpc

12 ) Sri Lanka scraps NTPC’s plan to build coal plant

http://www.thehindu.com/business/sri-lanka-scraps-ntpcs-plan-to-build-coal-plant/article9104518.ece

Indian people’s movements and civil society call upon Modi to withdraw India’s support from Rampal Coal-Power Project

 

Following the ongoing human rights violation of the National Committee activists and front-line organisers against Rampal coal-fired plant in Bangladesh, many concerned Indian green and human rights organisations have written an open letter to the Prime Minister of India to withdraw support from the Bangladesh-India Friendship Power Company, thereafter the destructive Rampal Power Project.  The letter signed by 43 organisations and many activists is as follows.  

 

October 18, 2016

 

An Open Letter to the Prime Minister on Rampal Power Project

 

Respected Prime Minister,

 

We, the people’s movements and other civil society organisations in India, draw your urgent attention to the serious issues emerging from the Bangladesh-India Friendship Power Company (Rampal Power Project), being built near the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Sundarbans in Bangladesh.

 

This project is opposed by people in Bangladesh and India for its monumental social and environmental negative impacts, particularly the irreversible damage to Sundarbans and the fragile ecosystem around it.

 

40% of the Sundarbans is in India and any damage to that will have devastating impacts on thousands of fishworkers and forest dwellers depending on it, apart from the damage to the natural protection from natural calamities like tsunami and cyclones.

 

The project is partly owned by NTPC, financed by Indian ExIm Bank, equipment’s supplied by BHEL and PricewaterhouseCoopers Private Limited, India contracted for long term coal sourcing. Hence India’s share in this project is significant.

 

People in Bangladesh, under the umbrella of National Oil, Gas, Mineral Resource, Power and Port Protection Committee, have been opposing the project with support of movements from different parts, including India. Leader of the National Committee Prof Anu Muhammad has been receiving death threats for the role he is playing for opposing the project.

 

While we condemn univocally death threats to Prof Anu Muhammad, we would urge you to request the Bangladesh government to ensure the safety of political activists there.

 

Further, we urge you to look at the colossal damage this project is causing to people and environment in India and Bangladesh and withdraw India’s support to the project.

 

 

Signed by:

Ashok Chowdhury & Roma Malik, All India Union of Forest Working People

Madhuresh Kumar, National Alliance of People’s Movements (NAPM)

Narmada Bachao Andolan

Soumya Dutta, Bharat Jan Vigyan Jatha

National Hawker Federation

Abhijit, Lokayat, Pune

Afsar Jafri, Focus on the Global South

All India Forum of Forest Movements

Ashok Shrimali – Secretary General of mm&P

Ayesha DSouza, Centre for Financial Accountability

Bharat Patel, Machimar Adhikar Sangharsh Sangathan

Environics Trust

Environment Support Group – Trust, Bangalore

Equations

Gautam Bandyopadhyay, Nadi Ghati Morcha

Gururaja Budhya, Urban Research Centre, Bangalore, India.

Himanshu Damle, Public Finance Public Accountability Collective (PFPAC)

Himanshu Thakkar. South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers & People. Delhi

Indian Social Action Forum (INSAF)

Indigenous Perspectives

Jiten Yumnam, Secretary, Centre for Research and Advocacy, Manipur

Kiran Shaheen, Aql ki Dhaba,

Krishnakant, Mithi Virdi

Maglin Peter, Teeradesa Mahila Vedi

Mahan Sangarsh Samiti

Manipur Cycle Club

Manshi Asher,  Himdhara Collective, Himachal Pradesh

Muthukrishnan, writer / Activist Madurai

North East Peoples Alliance

Priya Pillai, Greenpeace India

PT George, Intercultural Resources.

Ravi Rebbapragada, Executive Director, Samata India

Samir Mehta, International Rivers South Asia

Shripad Dharmadhikary, Manthan Adhyayan Kendra, Pune/Badwani

Shweta Tripatji, Society for Rural Urban & Tribal Initiative (SRUTI)

Sundarrajan, Sundarrajan, Poovulagin Nanbargal, KKNPP

Tarini Manchanda, filmmaker

The Research Collective

Umesh Babu, Delhi Forum

Vaishali Patil, Forum Against Disastorous Project in Konkan.

Vijay Pratap, South Asian Dialogues on Ecological Democracy (SADED)

Vimalbhai, Matu Jansangthan

Xavier Dias, Khan Kaneej Aur Adhirkar

Be There! We Are Coming to Your Door This Saturday!

Sundarbans, the World’s Largest Mangrove Forest is Under Attack. Save the Sundarbans and Stop Coal Fired Rampal Power Plant.

Recently, the Government of Bangladesh has signed an agreement with India’s state run Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd to set up a coal fired 1320 MW power plant on the edge of the world’s biggest heritage-listed mangrove forest, the Sundarbans. Rampal power plant will emit huge amount of carbon, sulphur, toxic gases, smoke and ashes which will destroy the forest.

Pollution from Ash and Smoke: – Annually, around 0.94 million tons of ash will be generated from the plant, of which 80% will be dry fly ash and the rest of the 20% will be bottom ash. This ash will contain many heavy metals, including arsenic, lead, mercury, nickel, vanadium, beryllium, barium, cadmigreen cultural activists at samageet brought in a a procession with a royal bengal tiget on Bangla New year 2016um, chromium, selenium and, radium, which are dangerous if released into environment. Toxic ash and smoke from burnt coal will pollute the air, land and water bodies and will endanger plant and wildlife.

 

Water Contamination: Water will be contaminated due to toxic ash, oil and coal spillage from the coal carrying vessels and other waste discharge.

 

Noise Pollution: There will be a lot of noise pollution from coal power plant itself, from transportation of coal carrying vessels and loading and unloading of coal.  Noise pollution will endanger wildlife.


Destruction of the Forest:

All the above mentioned disadvantages will results in destruction of Sundarbans, wildlife, flora and fauna, ecology and the environment.

Friends, please join us to stop this poisonous coal fired Rampal power plant and save Sundarbans!

Say NO to DESTRUCTIVE #RAMPALCOALPOWERPLANT

National Committee to Protect Oil Gas and Mineral Resources in Bangladesh, The UK branch

Contact 07714288221/ 07956260791/ 07506709691. Email: nationalcommittee.uk@gmail.com

 

Fascist attack on peaceful march in Bangladesh, Solidarity from London and across the earth to save the Sunderbans

  • 200 mangrove marchers brutally charged by police in Dhaka
  • 16 unarmed protesters seriously injured
  • Six frontline defenders and NCBD leaders imprisoned
  • Cops foiled public statement to cancel dark deal over world’s largest mangrove

By Rumana Hashem and Raj Manik

As you might have awaited update from Thursday’s public march against the destructive Rampal coal-power plant, we are in the process of doing a detailed and analytical report on the attack on peaceful marchers and the fascism of Bangladeshi police. For now, note that the Dhaka protest was attacked by state law enforcement force, and the Prime Minister shamefully denied to meet with the concerned citizens of Bangladesh who wanted to handover a statement to their Prime Minister.

Police opens fire on NCBD marchers in Dhaka 28 July 2016 The masculine male police beaten her so badly the female left activist went unconcious on 28 July 2016 NCBD march against Rampal deal to handover statement to PM of Bangladesh in Dhaka 28 July 2016 Dhaka March to Save the Sunderbans on 28 July 2016. copy right @NCBD Dhaka

When the marchers walked towards the Prime Minister’s office to submit a statement to save the Sunderbans, police unleashed violence on peaceful marchers, threw tear shells over a march of 200 protesters who sought to handover a public statement against the dark Rampal deal that would destroy the world’s largest mangrove, the Sunderbans. Many of our activists, including the Member Secretary of NCBD, Professor Anu Muhammad, were severely injured as beaten up by fascist police force who acted on behalf of a fascist government.  Students and women-environmentalists were beaten to such that several of them were taken to hospital in critical condition.

The leaders of National Committee and frontline organisers of the march were abused and six front-line protesters, including Anu Muhammad, were detained on arbitrary charges. Police did not only abuse and charge activists but also foiled the well-written public statement, which demanded the immediate cancellation of the destructive Rampal coal-fired plant, to symbolise that commons and citizens do not have the right to express opinion on natural and national resources in Bangladesh.

In a nutshell, we have seen a fascist face of the government of Bangladesh in the month of Mangrove Action. We have witnessed how a so called pro-independence government deployed fascist police to dismiss people’s urge to preserve national sovereignty. The state-law enforcement force had foiled demands to conserve the world’s largest mangrove forest just a day after the International Mangrove Action Day. This is shocking and sickening.

So proud of our women activists taking on frontline to defend environment and mangrove in Bangladesh 28 July 2016 environmental activist tortured by facist police in Dhaka on 28 July 2016

Dhaka March to PM office on 28 July 2016

Dhaka March to PM office on 28 July 2016. Copyright @NCBD

Although media coverage of this heinous attack on peaceful marchers was poor, we have heard the sound of angers, condemnation and protests across the earth on Thursday.  In London, the Bangladeshi community rallied under the banner of protect resources of Bangladesh, the UK branch, and unreservedly condemned the attacked on environmentalists and progressive activists in Dhaka.

protest against rampal in london on 28 July 2016 PROTEST at Altabl Ali Park on 28 July 2016 protest at altabl ali park in london on 28 july 2016

London protest against destructive Rampal power plant on 28 July 2016

London protest against destructive Rampal power plant on 28 July 2016. Photo credit: Shefa Ahmed and Rumana Hashem

Despite miserable weather and a week day afternoon, there was a great turn up of saddened Bengalese at Altab Ali Park at Aldgate East. Speakers include Bangladesh Socialist Party leader, Mostofa Kamal, European-Bangladesh Climate Change, Ansar Ahmed Ullah, Communist party leader, Dr Mohammad Ali Khan Jinnah, Photo journalist Peter Marshall, Worker’s party leader Ishaque Kajole, Dr Mokhlesur Rahman of NCBD UK , Dr Rumana Hashem of PSG and other community organisers. We were, of course, present at the rally from Phulbari Solidairty Group. But the question is: does the Bangladesh government care for what we think and say about our national environment and national resources?

We will be updating you on further development on this via twitter, blog and mailing lists.

What you can do to help us:

  • We would appreciate it if you can re-tweet our news and if you can tweet @PSG-BD
  • Please do your own outreach by using hashtag #Rampal and #SavetheSunderbans
  • We would appreciate it if you can avoid asking for money/donation from people for this mangrove action. Any sort of donation based campaign can undermine our cause and would let down the movement to save the Sunderbans.
  • If you need help, please do contact us for connecting on how to organise in your own locality and how to express solidarity with the protesters back home. You can email us: phulbarisolidaritygroup@gmail.com and rabbani.enpolicy@gmail.com

#SavetheSunderbans #StopRampalCoalFiredPlant

Further news:

Police foiled march: The daily Star report http://www.thedailystar.net/city/demo-sundarbans-foiled-10-held-1260748

 

Protest against Destructive Rampal Power Plant this Thursday

By Rumana Hashem

Despite nationwide protests and international campaigns against the controversial coal power plant in Rampal, Bangladeshi government has approved India‘s NTPC proposed Rampal power plant which, if implemented, will destroy the world’s largest mangrove, the Sundarbans. Bangladeshi and Indian governments have signed a destructive deal in July, the month of International Mangrove Action, when the world is supposed to celebrate International Mangrove Day.

On 13 July, Bangladesh and India have signed an agreement which enables India’s state run Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd. to implement the Rampal thermal power plant. The proposed plant would be built in 14 kilometres to the Sundarbans, a treasured ecosystem along Bangladesh’s coast.

It is outrageous that the governments of the two neighbouring states, Bangladesh and India, have disregarded the global calls and conspired to abandon people’s urge to prevent the construction of disparaging coal-power plant in Rampal from happening. They let Bangladesh’s only mangrove forest, Sundarbans, to be destroyed for self-interests. This deal has been signed at a time when Bangladesh has been undergoing political turmoil and religious genocide. The nation was focused on Gulshan attack when the two governments have approved the destructive deal.

The National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Port-Power and Mineral Resources in Bangladesh (NCBD) will march to the Prime Minister’s Office this Thursday, 28th July, to protest against the deal.

 

2

In solidarity with the protesters in Bangladesh, the UK branch of NCBD will rally against the destructive deal at 6.30pm on the same day at Altab Ali Park in East London.

Please join us along with your friends and raise your voice against this destructive project. Our outcry can protect the world’s largest mangrove forest, the local environment in Bangladesh, its ecology and species. #SavetheSundarbans

 

Read further news here:

A new power plant could devastate the world’s largest mangrove forest

Bangladesh, India sign Rampal power plant construction agreement

Additional information and news:

1.“Bangladesh Sticks With Coal Power Plant Project Despite Major Backlash,” Mongabay, February 16, 2016,
http://news.mongabay.com/2016/02/bangladesh-sticks-with-coal-power-plant-project-despite-major-backlash/

2. Anu Muhammad & Sheikh Muhammad Shaheedullah, “Manipulating Rampal,” Dhaka Tribune, March 31, 2016,
http://www.dhakatribune.com/op-ed/2016/mar/31/manipulating-rampal

  1. Dr. Abdullah Harun Chowdhury, “Environmental Impact of Coal Based Power Plant of Rampal on the Sundarbans and Surrounding Areas,” Khulna University, http://bagerhatsociety.com/apanel/admin/download/tdwn2573136.pdf
  2. “Ganges River Dolphin,” World Wildlife Foundation,http://www.worldwildlife.org/species/ganges-river-dolphin
  3. “Orion Signs Deals for Generators for its 660MW Power Plant,” The Daily Star, May 11, 2014, http://www.thedailystar.net/orion-signs-deals-for-generators-for-its-660mw-power-plant-23556
  4. Sönke Kreft, David Eckstein, Lukas Dorsch, and Livia Fischer, “Global Climate Risk Index 2016,” GermanWatch, November 2015, http://germanwatch.org/fr/download/13503.pdf

‘The Sundarbans Declaration 2016’ by the National Committee of Bangladesh

Translated By Tanmoy Karmokar

 

Following a three-day nationwide long march to the Sundarbans, held between 10th to 13th March, 2016 by demanding a capping of all breeds of devastative – mischeivious activities surrounding the Sundarbans, including the Rampal and Orion coal-based power projects, the National Committee to Protect Oil, Gas, Mineral resources, Port and Power in Bangladesh has declared the following ‘Sundarbans Declaration 2016’. The declaration is a demand for the enactment of 7-points programmes in order to resolve the country’s power crisis. The declaration was agreed by the protesters and marchers who joined the three-day long march to protest the coal based Rampal power plant. It was signed by the central leaders of National Committee and was read out at Kantakhali on 13th March, 2016.

banner Sundarbans 2016 2

We, the people on the march, have reached Katakhali, adjacent to the Sundarbans, on 13th March noon, by crossing 400 kilometers in 4 days after the long march has started on the 10th March. Starting on 10th March, 2016 at the Press Club in Dhaka, we have marched to Katakhali via Manikganj, Rajbari, Faridpur, Magura, Jhinaidaha, Kaliganj, Jessore, Nowapara, Fultola, Doulatpur, Khulna and Bagherhat. Hundreds of thousands of community folks have expressed their solidarity with us in the course of progression of this long march and during the time of preparation focusing the 7-point demands and to protect the Sundarbans. People of Bangladesh from all walks of life have participated here. Some of the many organisations are: leftist progressive democratic political parties, farmers-day labours-women-students-youth-science organisations, music groups, theater groups, film organisations, study circle groups, little magazine groups and many more. Along with the political activists and leaders, there are participants from academics, school and college teachers, students, scientists, engineers, professionals, artists, writers, journalists, filmmakers, farmers, workers, housewives, and community women and men. During the long march, several solidarity demonstrations and public meetings were also held in London, Amsterdam and Paris.

During our long march in Bangladesh, we had been faced with administrative threats and harassment by Police when our long march tried to enter the district of Jessore. They attempted to downfall the long march by rescinding approval of a pre-scheduled demonstration in the final phase. Not only revocation but also had they tried to obstruct the program by menacing when entering Jessore and during our stay inside the city. But the Sundarbans long march had entered the district of Jessore by passing all the stumbling blocks, and successfully completed its journey by organising protest-rallies and processions. From today’s meeting, we, once again, strongly protest the odious conspiracy of the government and administration.

This long march has been organized with a view to voicing the ‘7-point demands’ to mitigate energy crisis, including immediate annulment of the  Rampal and Orion power projects, and to avert destruction of the Sundarbans. While the government is leading the violent invasion of the profiteers on the Sundarbans by wreck, ravage and appropriation in the name of power generation and development, people at the same time by virtue of their sovereign rights are forming a domain of resistance. This long march is part of that long-term resistance.

The Sundarbans is not just some flora and faunas but a splendid mangrove forest that offers much more than one sees. It is the noble sum of myriad lives, a peerless ecosystem and natural safety net as an extraordinary resorvour of biodiversity and a renowned world heritage. This mangrove forest does not only provide the livelihood of millions of inhabitants but also saves the life and belongings of about 40 million people from natural catastrophes like Sidr and Aila. The vast coastline area alongside the country’s geographical border and outside the border is in effect allied with the existence of the Sundarbans.

The agreement signed between the National Thermal Power Corporation  of India and the Power Development Board of Bangladesh is totally unequal, one-sided and against the national interest of Bangladesh. Likewise the Orion Company of Bangladesh- it was given permission to set up coal-based power plant by turning a blind eye to all kinds of laws and rules. Apart from the irreplaceable destruction of mankind and nature, Bangladesh will suffer from huge financial loss if this project is executed. Earlier land acquisition by abnegating the codes of environmental assessment, persecution and eviction of local inhabitants, rejection of the High Court ruling and late formulation of a self-contradictory, flawed, incomplete, and preposterous environmental assessment – all emphasised that the local and international groups are frenzied to establish these power plants. However, independent studies on and investigations about the Sundanbans implied that our forest will face a catastrophe once the power plants are established and the entire Bangladesh will be susceptible.

Long-term research by the environmental and climate scientists show that the Rampal coal-based power plant will annually generate 52 thousand tons of toxic Sulfur dioxide, 30 thousand tons of Nitrogen dioxide, 0.75 million tons of fly ash and 2 hundred thousands of bottom ash. Further, water withdrawal from the River of Pashur at a rate of 9150 cubic meter per hour, subsequent colossal discharge of the polluted water into the river, and temperature of the discharged water and various toxic elements dissolved in the water will damage the natural water flow of the river, its ability to carry sediment and the life cycle of fishes, plants and other living beings. Indeed, what we see is that ultimately aquatic ecology of the Sundarbans will be destroyed by those coal based projects. Coal transportation through the Sundarbans, liquid and solid toxic wastes from the ships, oil spillage, flood lights will be devastative for normal life cycle and biodiversity of the Sundarbans. In addition, the pollution will take on its worst form if the 565 MW Orion plant and another 1320 MW unit in Rampal will be established.

As it seems now all arrangements to assassin the Sundarbans are in full swing. The massive shelter of life by establishing Rampal and Orion power projects on the one hand, by ignoring all forms of protests from the people and rejecting expert opinions on the dire consequences, and on the other hand, various projects in the name of power plant are being undertaken for the interests of land-grabbers. The forest is getting damaged everyday by the aggression of the profiteers. Various commercial and illicit activities like shipyards, silos and cement factories are on the rise. While the country, especially the coastal areas, are facing climate change threats, many indiscreet projects along the coastal line, such as, Rampal and Madarbari are simply worsening the situation and posing new dangers to our climate and livelihood. A nuclear power plant in Rooppur is also under process of construction, posing grave threats to our environment and communities.

We want to declare firmly that sustainable solution to country’s power crisis can only be found in the implementation of the 7-point programmes of the National Committee. Sustainable development or solution to energy crisis cannot be found in destructive projects like Rampal, Rooppur or Moheshkhali power plants.

For the last one and a half decades, one of the leading issues that National Committee has been working on is how to ensure a sustainable system of constant power supply. We said:

  • If the primary fuel for energy production remains under national ownership,
  • if a ban on export of mineral resources can be legally adopted,
  • if the renewable and non-renewable fuel-based segments of power generation can be expanded,
  • if the growth of national capability can be prioritized in all these aspects, Bangladesh can very soon attain its level of self-dependency.
  • It is very much possible to deliver power in every household and a major change is agro-economy is also probable. But the power sector remains with crises and it has become increasingly expensive and aid-dependent for the government is engaged in nourishing the local and foreign plunderers instead of adopting the right path as per continuation of the previous governments. What the government has adopted in the name of energy-crisis mitigation is actually serving the local and international looters. Terrible burdens of aid along with newer threats of environmental dangers are being imposed upon people. This is why this public-march is strongly demanding the execution of the 7-point demands of the National Committee, including immediate annulment of PSC agreement, immediate cessation of handing of oil and gas resources of the Bay of Bengal over to the foreign companies without any tender process, and complete enactment of Phulbari agreement and legal ban on export of mineral resources.

We have been constantly illustrating examples that there are many choices for power generation, but there is no substitute to the Sundarbans. This mangrove forest along with the country is now bearing the bruises due to adoption of wrong governmental policies, corruptions and invasions slanted towards profits, over and over. We showed with evidence that the Rampal and Orion power plants will be the death blow. We will not let the Sundarbans, the part of our existence to be destroyed for the sake of span-less profit of some Indian Company. We will not let the local land grabbers go uninterrupted. We cannot allow our Bangladesh go in the hands of occupant pillagers – regardless of whether it is India, China, the USA or Russia. We cannot let our Bangladesh emerging from the freedom fight drag into some imperial ploy.

In order to save the Sundarbans, situated alongside both the borders of Bangladesh and India,  and to prevent our existence from being destroyed by a coal-based project, this is a timely call to join our hands with our Indian activists and community people. We are demanding the Indian government to repeal this project and also urging the people of India to join the fight. It is also a juncture when we need to interconnect the fight of the people across the world. Many have already expressed their solidarity with us, whom we would like to thank and congratulate as timely comrades.

We demand the Bangladesh government to immediately stop all kinds of vindictive activities against the Sundarbans. We also demand an immediate constitution and implementation of ‘The Sundarbans Policy’ to help the forest develop in a healthy and regenerative way. We are demanding from the long march that, Rampal, Orion and all other harmful projects around the vicinity of the Sundanbans must be turned around within 15th of May. If necessary, we urge the government to come to an open discussion or debate with us. And if the government fails to abandon this cataclysmic project within this time line, we with the rank and file of the country will be compelled to declare Dhaka going long march, sit-in, besiege, strike, blockade and other programs to trigger a larger movement.

We urge scientists, engineers, academics, writers, artists, day-workers, farmers, students, teachers and community women and men at all levels of the society to strengthen the national defense by collective and active participation. It is this Sundarbans that protected us from dangers in many ways. To protect these beautiful and kind forests is our national obligation. We all have to come forward with this obligation. We shall in no way let our noble and motherly icon Sundarbans be a victim to profits of the local and international extortionists.

 

Kantakhali. 13th March, 2016

#SAVEtheSUNDARBANS   #StopRAMPALPowerPlant  #NOCOALbasedPOWERPLANT

#SavetheSundarbans Long March – Solidarity Meeting

The Sundarbans is Under Threat!

 

Long march to save the sundarbans March 12 to 15 2016

 

#SavetheSundarbans Long March – Solidarity Meeting in Support of Nationwide march 10-13 March 2016

Friday, 11 March @6:30pm at Montefiore Centre, Whitechapel, London E1 5HZ

 

Despite huge protests and deep concerns of conscious citizens, Bangladesh government has given license to two greedy corporations who want to build a large coal fired-plant in Rampal, which is the close vicinity of the Sundarbans, Bangladesh’s mangrove forest, a UNESCO Heritage and a beautiful home to rare and wild animals including Bangladesh’s well-known Tigers. Sundarbans means “the beautiful forests,” and it lives up to its name in both benefits and productivity. It is not only beautiful but also extraordinarily rich in biodiversity and productivity.

The Sundarbans is the single largest mangrove forest in the world. The Sundarbans has also been a huge natural safeguard against frequent cyclone, storm and other natural disasters in the country. In every natural disaster, the Sundarbans saves lives of hundreds of thousands of people, while nurturing a rich coastal ecosystem. The Sundarbans is vital for all of us on this planet to help counter climate change.

But the proposed Rampal Coal Power Project will destroy the Sundarbans and coastal ecosystem. The project is a highly contested joint venture by the Indian state owned National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) and Orion, a corporation owned by Bangladesh state owned Power Development Board (PDB). It needs to stop now.

Bangladeshi environmentalists are marching from Dhaka to Rampal to #savetheSundarbans.

A three-day long-march to #SavetheSundarbans will be held on 10-13 March, when people will walk from different regions to meet in Rampal and demonstrate against the deception and mass destruction. Organised by the National Committee to Protect Oil Gas Mineral Resources Port and Power, the main demand for this long march is to cancel ‘Rampal coal fired power plant’ and stop all activities that would destroy the Sundarbans.

In London, we are holding a solidarity meeting with the Bangladeshi marchers.

Join us with your friends to discuss ways to prevent mass destruction. Demand cancellation of the construction of the Rampal power plant.

Please confirm your participation here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1721329244770557/

For further information contact:   07956260791/07714288221, email: nationalcommittee.uk@googlemail.com

National Committee to Protect Oil Gas Mineral Resources Port and Power, UK branch, London